AAA Montreal 2011: the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association. This was my first meeting since I began Living Anthropologically, the first meeting I knew to follow #AAA2011 on Twitter. Great session on Digital Anthropology: Projects and Projections on Sunday. Daniel Lende of Neuroanthropology was there and also had a great round-up, including a look at the session hashing over the anthropology-as-science issue. Lende highlights biological anthropology, and for another look at biological anthropology sections see Julienne Rutherford’s Biological Anthropology sessions at AAA.

Given those great round-ups, I took a different tack here and highlighted some sessions on political economy as well as on Latin America and the Caribbean. I’ve realized with some of the pushback I received on the Anthropology, Moral Optimism, and Capitalism post that there are many people who simply have no idea anthropologists study contemporary political and economic issues. They don’t think anthropologists have anything to say about issues like the death penalty, and often would rather not hear it anyway.

I’m tagging here things emphasized by the Society for Economic Anthropology (SEA), the Society for the Anthropology of Work (SAW), and the Society for Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology (SLACA).

The Book Exhibit

At Berghahn books, check out Classifying to Kill: An Ethnography of the Death Penalty System in the United States by Brackette F. Williams. Brackette is an incredibly dedicated ethnographer and one of the most perceptive theorists in anthropology. Her Annual Review article from 1989, A Class Act: Anthropology and the Race to Nation Across Ethnic Terrain is still enormously important. I saw Brackette at the 2010 meetings, when she was an organizer for a panel in honor of Michel-Rolph Trouillot, and she spoke of this book–very excited to see it, although it looks like it is presently only in hardcover.

Wednesday, November 16

14:00-17:45 ETHNOGRAPHIES OF FINANCIALIZED LIVES

18:00-21:45 CAPITALISM AND GLOBAL ANTHROPOLOGY: MARXISM RESURGENT

20:00-21:45 PURPOSIVE ECONOMIES IN THE NEOLIBERAL ERA

Thursday, November 17

8:00-9:45 BEYOND THE SOCIAL LIFE OF THINGS: NATURAL RESOURCES AND EMERGENT PERSONHOODS

13:45-17:30 FEMINISM AND REPRODUCTION: TRACES, TIDEMARKS AND LEGACIES (Full disclosure: I’m married to one of the panelists, who blogs at parenthropology)

13:45-17:30 ECONOMIES OF AFFECT

16:00-17:45 THE GLOBAL CRISIS OF STATELESSNESS AND THREATS TO BIRTHRIGHT CITIZENSHIP

Friday, November 18

10:15-12:00 ANTHROPOLOGIES AND ETHNOGRAPHIES OF THE MARKET: ACTORS MODELS AND COUNTER-MODELS

13:45-17:30 ILLEGAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGISTS

13:45-17:30 AFTER EXTINCTION: ECONOMIES OF END TIMES, ETHNOGRAPHIES OF EMERGENCE

15:25 Please Don’t Beat Me, Sir!

18:30-20:00 Interest Group for the Anthropology of Public Policy Distinguished Lecture: Gilian Tett

18:15-20:30 “WORK” AS FIELDWORK IN ANTHROPOLOGY TODAY: A GRADUATE STUDENT SPECIAL EVENT/DISCUSSION FOLLOWED BY MEET & GREET

21:00 ABA/SANA/AFA/ALLA/AES/SLACA/SUNTA DANCE PARTY AND RECEPTION I

Saturday, November 19

8:00-9:45 ANTHROPOLOGY MAKING A MARK: EXAMPLES OF PUBLIC OUTREACH

8:00-11:45 ANTHROPOLOGIES OF THE COVERT: FROM SPYING AND BEING SPIED UPON TO SECRET MILITARY OPS AND THE CIA

10:15-12:00 MUSEUMIZING THE ANIMAL: NARRATING HUMAN ONTOLOGIES THROUGH ANIMAL EPISTEMOLOGIES

13:00-15:00 The Accessible Anthropological Assembly: An Alternative for Montreal 2011

16:00-17:45 NOSTALGIA FOR INDUSTRY IN THE HINTERLAND (Full disclosure: I’m the organizer of this panel and co-authored a presentation)

Sunday, November 20

8:00-11:45 SMALL-SCALE PRODUCERS AND RURAL ECONOMIES IN THE 21ST CENTURY: RE-TRENCHING, RE-DEFINING, RE-ENERGIZING

10:15-12:00 TRACES OF THE SAFETY NET: POLITICAL RESPONSES TO GLOBAL CAPITALIST RESTRUCTURING IN CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE

12:15-14:00 LABOR: NEGOTIATING CHANGES

12:15-14:00 INEQUALITY: IMMIGRATION, HOUSING AND RACE

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