Intro to Anthro 2020

This is the homepage for Introduction to Anthropology 2020, a course taught by Jason Antrosio at Hartwick College. Current students can access the Hartwick D2L Version. This course is a mid-stream modified version adapted for the coronavirus outbreak. As such, it shares content with Intro-to-Anthro 2019, and gives current students a chance to interact with their peers from last year in the Disqus comment section.

Part 3: Knowing

11. Mon 3/30: Race & Culture

  • Muckle and González chapter 8 (part 1 of 2), “Culture” (171-186)

12. Wed 4/1: Enculturation

  • M&G chapter 8 (part 2 of 2), “Culture 2” (186-198)
  • Meredith Small, “Our Babies, Ourselves.” Natural History (1997).

13. Mon 4/6: Language

  • M&G chapter 9, “Language and Culture” (199-223)
  • Laura Bohannan, “Shakespeare in the Bush.” Natural History (1966).

14. Wed 4/8: Food-Getting

  • M&G chapter 10, “Food-Getting and Economics” (225-252)
  • Richard Borshay Lee, “Eating Christmas in the Kalahari.” Natural History (1969).

15. Mon 4/13: Marriage-Family

  • M&G chapter 11 (part 1 of 2), “Marriage, Family, and Gender” (253-266)

16. Wed 4/15: Gender

  • M&G chapter 11 (part 2 of 2), “Marriage, Family, and Gender” (266-281)
  • Alexandra Kralick, “What Our Skeletons Say About the Sex Binary.” Sapiens (2018).

17. Mon 4/20: Organization

  • M&G chapter 12, “Political Organization” (283-304)

Wed 4/22: Exam #3

Part 4: Doing

18. Magic

  • Muckle and González chapter 13, “Supernaturalism” (305-327).
  • George Gmelch, “Baseball Magic” (2000).

19. Sustainability

  • Muckle and González chapter 14, “Anthropology and Sustainability” (329-354)

20. Difference

  • Ingold, “On Taking Others Seriously” and “Similarity & Difference” (1-51)

21. Society

  • Ingold, “A Discipline Divided” and “Rethinking the Social” (52-105)

22. Future

  • Ingold, “Anthropology for the Future” (106-131)

Final Exam

Part 1: Evolving

1. Perspective

  • M&G, chapter 1 (part 1 of 2), “Introduction: Viewing the World” (1-14)

2. History

  • M&G chapter 1 (part 2 of 2), “Introduction: Viewing the World” (14-27)
  • Horace Miner, “Body Ritual Among the Nacirema,” American Anthropologist (1956)

3. Primates

  • M&G chapter 2, “We Are Primates” (29-53)
  • Barbara Smuts, “What are Friends For?” Natural History (1987)

4. Evolutionary

  • M&G chapter 3, “Evolutionary Thought and Theory” (55-72)
  • Agustin Fuentes, “Human niche, human behaviour, human nature.” Interface Focus (2017)

5. Hominins

  • M&G chapter 4, “Human Biological Evolution” (73-97)
  • Berger, Lee R., et al. “Homo naledi and Pleistocene hominin evolution in subequatorial Africa.” eLife (2017)

Part 2: Growing

6. Tools

  • M&G, chapter 5, “Diversity: 2.5 million to 20,000 Years Ago” (99-119)
  • April Nowell and Melanie Chang, “Science, the Media, and Interpretations of Upper Paleolithic Figurines.” American Anthropologist (2014)
  • Fuentes on the “Human niche” (5-8)

7. Paleo

  • M&G chapter 6 (part 1 of 2), “Food: 20,000 to 5,000 Years Ago” (121-139)
  • Jared Diamond, “The Worst Mistake in the History of the Human Race.” Discover (1987).

8. Settlements

  • M&G ch. 6 (part 2 of 2), “Organization: 20,000 to 5,000 Years Ago” (139-145)
  • Melinda Zeder, “Why evolutionary biology needs anthropology.” Evolutionary Anthropology (2018)
  • Fuentes on the “Human niche” (8-10)

9. Collapse?

  • M&G chapter 7, “Archaeology of the Last 5,000 Years” (147-169)
  • Michael Wilcox, “Marketing conquest and the vanishing Indian: An Indigenous response to Jared Diamond’s Guns, Germs, and Steel and Collapse.” Journal of Social Archaeology (2010)

This is the homepage for Introduction to Anthropology 2019-2020 taught by Jason Antrosio at Hartwick College. There are two required books:

This class shared some readings with Intro-to-Anthropology 2018, but in this course I switched textbooks away from Lavenda and Schultz’s Anthropology: What Does it Mean to be Human? to Muckle and González.


Living Anthropologically brings anthropology to life & public debates. Anthropology documents possibility & creativity to effect change. For updates, follow on Twitter or subscribe.

Living Anthropologically is part of the Amazon Associates program and earns a commission from qualifying purchases, including ads and Amazon text links.